Newman Volunteering Award – Student Saleha’s Case Study

Published by Huma Whitehouse on

Hear from our student Saleha about why she took part in the Newman Volunteering Award. 
1. How did you hear about the Newman Volunteering Award?

“I found out about the Newman University Volunteering award a couple of months later after starting my volunteering at two organisations. I heard about the volunteering award through a workshop that the careers team did. I used the Volunteering Award handbook which was simple and easy to read. It told me about the different awards that I can achieve. Also, the handbook told me of what volunteering would count and which wouldn’t, and that was helpful. When I was filling in the volunteering form there’s certain things that I couldn’t do because I find maths very difficult. I reached out to one of the members of careers and told them I was struggling. As a result of this, the staff member supported me and helped me with my form.”

2. What are the benefits of volunteering?

“The benefit of my volunteering is that I have achieved two gold awards that I can put on my CV and will show on my Higher Education Achievement Record. The volunteering handbook has inspired me to aim for more hours. When I did the volunteering form, it suggested how I could support the community and what skills I can develop through volunteering. The thing I enjoyed most is meeting new people, making friends and having good contacts for the future.  As I volunteered in two organisations, I met a lot of new people including different clients and participants. I also met all different ages of volunteers and learnt a lot from their different perspectives. I still have contact with both hosts and I am still able to use them as a reference which I will be using for other volunteering I do and future employment.”

3. How will the volunteering you did help you in the future?

“I feel happy that I have finished this volunteering and gained awards. However, I will be doing more volunteering in the future to support the community. The positive impact of volunteering is that it has given me new skills, such as being more confident in my own voice, working in a group, listening to all clients from different backgrounds. The hardest skill I learned was communication as a lot of my clients did not speak English and I found it very hard to communicate at first. As the days went on, I was able to understand the clients more by using different methods, such as google translator and using body language and hand gestures. I now feel more confident and cannot wait to put my skills and experiences on my CV to aid in more job opportunities.”

4. What advice would you give to other students who are considering volunteering?

“My advice to students who are volunteering in their spare time is to fill out the volunteering form and gain the awards whilst at University. You can gain different awards depending on the hours worked and only need 20 hours to gain a Bronze! I would also advise students to create a CV and LinkedIn profile, as this will give you opportunities to meet other employers and find jobs with the skills and experience they have gained. Finally, if you are struggling to do anything that has been mentioned above or need advice about anything, you should get in touch with careers, because they are very supportive.

I would like to thank Annette Samuel for supporting me all the way through and helping me to calculate and record my hours so that I was able to achieve my awards. Thank you Annette for being supportive to me and listening to me!”

Find out more about the Newman Volunteering Award by visiting this website.